Beginners

Headlocking Gyro Thread.Beginners on Model-Helicopters.ComBeginners can get advice and help from all the Model Helicopter pilots around the world !
Ask questions and discuss everything you need to know as a Beginner.
To post your questions and comments, simply login or Join free now !


 
Roger1950 Roger1950's icon
 2008-02-05 18:36:32
Can you tell me the difference in head locking gyros and none heading lock, I have a CSM ICG180 none headlocking fitted on my Raptor 30 that I have just purchased,is this ok to learn on or shouild I invest in a better one.
        Photo Gallery

 
Sbrown5925 Sbrown5925's icon
 2008-02-05 19:01:16
Hi.
A non heading lock gyro will sence a twist movement induced either by wind or torque and compensate. It is only interested in stopping that twist and will instigate oposite rudder untill that movement is arrested.
Once it has stopped it will remove the compensation. So if you were side on to wind, you will tend to notice a slow turn into wind as it compensates, removes the input, re senses twist and compensates and on and on.

A heading lock gyro remembers the heading of your helicopter. If you put the rudder in, it allows the twist as it can clearly see you have chosen to turn. If on the other hand it senses a twist and no input from you, it will no only arrest the twist with oposite rudder input, but it will put the heading back to the original.
So it does as it says, it locks the heading no matter what, unless you input a command.
Depending on the servo quality and particular heading lock gyro, you won't even see a movement. They are so incredibly fast that the tail will just sit solid in the hover even when the wind hits it. These modern heading lock gyros and top digital servos have allowed pilots to take their flying skills to further exciting extremes that could never have been acheived with no heading lock gyros.

as for a beginner, I personally would say there are not too many gyros worse than the csm 180. Whoops, sozz If that upsets a few. It is often a gyro included in a starters package to keep the cost realistic and get you into the hobby. I guess there is no reason why you should not use this and learn to work that tail, but if you actually invested in a quality heading lock gyro and suitable matched servo, you will find the whole combination more of a pleasure to hover.

You will probably find that with the 180, you are rather uncomfortable with how the tail feels loose and random to an extent.

Remember that with a non heading lock gyro, you do need the tail compensation to be correctly setup by an experienced pilot as this will help to compensate for the torque changes as you open and close that throttle.

Si

 
Alvin Alvin's icon
 2008-02-05 22:14:42
this gyro suffers from drift problems, this means the tail will constantly pirouette slightly in the hover,as simon pointed out you would be better opting for a heading lock gyro.I don't think they are a suitable gyro to learn to fly on,from personal experience.many folk have done though,including me,but there is no point making life miserable for yourself(and life is miserable when you have to use a csm 180) smilie
        Photo Gallery

 
Roger1950 Roger1950's icon
 2008-02-06 21:02:37
Thanks for the info lads, I have ordered a csm Micro SL310 hope this will perform better for me.

Roger
        Photo Gallery

 
Alvin Alvin's icon
 2008-02-07 20:07:42
it will do,just make sure the heli is set up without too many vibrations,as csm gyro's are sensitive to vibrations.
        Photo Gallery

 
Nevans Nevans's icon
 2008-02-18 17:42:50
I personaly think that it's best to learn to fly in non heading lock mode. When one is starting to learn to fly, a tail that follows the nose is one less thing to worry about, and it's possible to get into some hairy sideways situations that an inexperienced pilot might struggle with.
        Photo Gallery

 
Crasherman Crasherman's icon
 2008-02-18 18:12:53
I think a beginner is best to use the heading lock when he is doing the very first skill. That being the hover. If he is trying to get that hover sorted out, and is putting the pitch and throttle in a bit much sometimes, the tail can swing around unless tail compensation is set up.. And if the wind hits the side, the helicopter can turn.
Using heading lock to master the hover I think is the best thing to do, because it will give more confidence and let the pilot focus on his cyclic and pitch. Learning to hover and work out the "pendulum" effect and that they hang to the side slightly is difficult on it's own.

When they start to fly around without heading lock might help because of the "weather cock" effect as it flys forward. I think that even in this case it is best to get used to heading lock and putting the amount of rudder in.
I don't remember how bad it was without heading lock, when you don't have any tail compensation and flying around. If you throttle off to try and bring it back into the hover, will the tail not swing a bit.. With a csm180 I think it will as this is not the best gyro for holding the tail I think.
        Photo Gallery

 
Alvin Alvin's icon
 2008-02-18 20:54:32
even with revolution mixing in the transmitter,the csm 180 will still swing round quite badly.i'm amazed they still sell them really,they are a very poor gyro.
        Photo Gallery

 
Roger1950 Roger1950's icon
 2008-02-19 17:40:39
Thanks for all the info lads, I have fitted the new CSM micro 310 to my Raptor 30 and have now flown it (just hovering tail in at the moment) It seems to be working fine, rock steady and does not seem to want to spin around at all and keeps a very good head, I got one of our local heli men at the local club to set her up for me, a tweak here and a tweak there and it now sits in the hover rock steady, just right for a novice like myself.

Roger

Delta Hawks Model Flying Club
        Photo Gallery

 
Alvin Alvin's icon
 2008-02-19 20:16:05
great stuff!
        Photo Gallery